Pura EPA

Pure EPA Fish Oil, Benefiting People All Over The World Since 2005.

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Strong , Clean, Premium
Effective

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Surpasses International fish
oil standards

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Sustainable , Strong
Wild Fish Oil.

Omega 3 Info

Natural and the best fish oil capsules money can buy

Is Pure EPA Safe?

The simple answer is yes. Pure EPA is an omega 3 fish oil supplement that is very high in EPA (93%). The oil comes from deep sea cold water fish such as horse mackerel, herring and salmon. They come from natural fishing grounds off the coast of South America.

Is it natural?

Even the capsule is from a vegetable source, this allows us to say our pure EPA omega 3 is entirely natural.

Fish consumption

It is theoretically possible to derive EPA solely from fish, however in order to obtain the high concentration and daily dose required you would have to consume a very large amount daily, with which would bring negative side effects due to all the pollutants, this is why it is important to choose a very high quality, safe, natural fish oil such as Pure EPA.

Vitamin E

Natures very own antioxidant, Pure EPA contains a dose of vitamin E that helps tp protect the freshness of the oil and keep it in an active state within its capsule and the body.

Omega 3 Fish Oil

Omega 3 Fish Oil Production

Omega 3 Fish oil is produced by a continuous and carefully controlled process, the main objective it to remove all impurities from the crude omega 3 fish oil ( free fatty acids, coloured components, protein residues, oxidation products etc ) in order to obtain a clear almost colourless oil with a low content of oxidation products and other contaminants. The processes involved are comparable to the ones used in the processing of all edible oils and fats, that is, deacidification, winterisation, bleaching and deodorization.

Omega 3 fish oils – Essential Fatty Acids

The term essential is deduced from Latin. Essential fatty acids are nutritional factors, discovered in 1929 at the University of Minnesota by George and Mildred Burr. Like vitamins, they are not synthesizable by the human body and therefore must be absorbed from food.A fantastic source of essential fatty acids is from omega 3 fish oils.

Omega Fatty Acids

Omega 3 fish oils are so called because the omega fatty acids are named according to the position of the first double bond in their carbon chains. Thus, the first double bond in the omega 6,s begins at the sixth carbon from the end of the chain. The first double bond in the omega 3,s begins at the third carbon position from the end of the chain, once in the body both omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids are bio chemically converted and control the body initially in two ways. First, they become incorporated into the cell membranes and secondly keep the cell membrane optimally fluid. If there are not enough omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids, these cell walls will incorporate saturated fatty acids and other lipids and become less fluid. In fact, essential fatty acids are the major building blocks of cellular membranes surrounding every cell in the body, know as lipid bilayers, because they are made up of two layers of fat, these fatty acid walls help to control the opening and closing of the cells channels that allow the passage of important messenger molecules into and out of the cell. In a second pathway, the omegas convert to hormone like substances called eicosanoids that influence metabolic activities, it is important the body has an adequate balance. The recommended ratio is 3-5: 1 of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids.

OMEGA 6 OMEGA 3
Linolenic acid Alpha-linolenic acid
Gamma-Linolenic acid C 18.4
Dihomogamma linolenic acid C 20.4
Arachidonic acid Eicosapentaenoic acid
C 22.4 C 22.5
C 22.5 Docosahexaenoic acid

Flaxseed Oil versus Fish Oil

A common myth about the benefits of flaxseed oil…

As more and more people become aware of the importance of fat in their diet, there’s growing interest in the benefits of flaxseed oil. Flaxseed oil is rich in a type of fat known as omega-3 (you’ll also see it written as n-3).

Because flaxseed oil also contains omega-3 fatty acids, it’s easy to confuse the benefits of flaxseed oil with those of fish oil. However, what many don’t realize is that the omega-3 fatty acids found in flax are not the same as those in fish.

Flaxseed oil

Fish oil contains two omega-3 fatty acids known as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Flaxseed oil, on the other hand, is rich in alpha-linolenic acid, which is the “parent” fatty acid to DHA and EPA. Although similar in structure, the benefits of alpha-linolenic acid, EPA, and DHA are not the same.

Your body converts alpha-linolenic acid rapidly into EPA, and more slowly into DHA. Roughly 11 grams of alpha-linolenic acid is needed to produce one gram of DHA and EPA. However, other foods in your diet can easily put the brakes on this conversion process.

A diet that’s rich in trans-fatty fatty acids, for instance, will “interfere” with the conversion of alpha-linolenic acid into EPA and DHA. Trans-fatty acids are found in foods such as cookies, some types of margarine, chips, cakes, and popcorn. When you see hydrogenated oil on the ingredients label of a food, there are probably some trans-fatty acids in there somewhere.

Balance

It’s also very important to make sure that your diet contains the right balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. A healthy diet consists of roughly two to four times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. In other words, for every four grams of omega-6 fatty acids, aim for at least one gram of omega-3 fatty acids.

Because traditional sources of fat (such as butter) have been replaced with vegetable oils (sunflower oil and corn oil, for example), the typical diet contains 14 to 25 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. A diet that contains too many omega-6 fatty acids at the expense of omega-3 fatty acids also limits the conversion of alpha-linolenic acid into EPA and DHA.

This doesn’t mean there are no benefits of flaxseed oil. Foods high in alpha-linolenic acid (such as walnuts and flaxseed oil) are a useful addition to the diet of anyone who wants a leaner, healthier body. They should, however, be consumed as part of a diet containing high-fat, cold-water fish (such as salmon) and/or fish oil supplements.

Reference

Gerster, H. (1998). Can adults adequately convert alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) to eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3)? International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, 68, 159-173.

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